How To Mix and Match Textile Patterns like a Bohemian Superstar

For those of us whose home is a playful canvas to experiment with, who aren't afraid to get it wrong, and ugly cringe at matchy match decor... who love to travel and bring home treasures - let's be honest - we have waaay too much stuff, in every colour and pattern imaginable and we want it all on display. 
So here are my tips on how to mix and match all different patterns like a Bohemian Superstar

Tip 1 - Multiple Patterns in the One Palette.

This delicious room below found at the Peacock Pavilions in Marrakech has multiple patterns - geometric, midwestern, African, abstract, striped - yet it all works harmoniously because it's predominantly in the orange and red hues. If you have a favourite color then this method of decorating is easy.

This amazing bedroom at Tierra del Lagarto in Arizona with its cool blues and turquoises incorporates stripes, spots, chevron, paisley and foulard. It just goes to show that you can never layer too many textiles, especially in a bedroom.

This is an African/Asian mix by the very talented Justine Blakeney. Strong geometrics in the African style mixed up with modernised asian botanicals and traditional looking moroccan prints in a muted palette gives this a very cohesive look. These have all been designed to go together for the busy person who hasn’t time to scour google for those special one-off global pieces but still wants the well travelled look. Check out her shop at jungalow.com 

Tip 2 - Complimentary colors (opposite sides of the color wheel) 

The coral/antique red and blue complementary palette combine to give a cohesive edge to a striped/geometric/floral extravaganza. Umberto Pasti has not held back on his maximalism, but the effect is as exotic as one could wish for a house in countryside Morocco.

This gorgeous set up by Jo at La Boheme really works because the green and purple are complimentary jewel colors. She follows the cohesion through with purple and orange wall art that compliments the moroccan rug. And you cannot go wrong with a green velvet sofa. She has a medley of asian, Kilim and block velvet pillows and an indigo mud cloth throw to round out her global, eclectic and bohemian vibe. This girl is a pattern mixing master.

 

Again we have predominantly strong jewel colors, but the red wall hanging is leaning towards warmer tones which offsets the sage and yellow throw blanket beautifully. The moroccan pillows, while being predominantly red, have blue accents to them which tie in with the indigo sofa. The green cupboard is a master stroke and works because of its strong color and the blue sofa. Justine Blakeney does it again.

 

Tip 3 - Start with a statement piece and work around that.

Take this cheerful boho living room corner. It just shows that if you start with your most expensive decor item, in this case this gorgeous rug, then work out from there you can’t go wrong. Pink and yellow have been chosen as the accent colors in equal proportions, with a bold mustard velvet chair and oversized pink kilim floor cushions. Just as easily Jo from La Boheme could have chosen green and yellow or green and pink. It doesnt really matter. What is important is that all the textiles are globally inspired and richly textured, while the accent chair is a delicious velvet. 

A Penny Morrisson masterpiece in pattern mixing and matching. A lot of Central Asian, Indian and Chinese textiles mixed with some elegant stripes. The contrast in sizes of design from the large sofa throw to the tiny pink geometric design is wonderful, and she has effortlessly thrown pink, blue, mustard, orange, red and green together in an exotic interior Milieu. This is master level and most of us trying to achieve this will end up with a mess of chaos. 

And a tiny tribute to the fabulous Tony Duquette whose bold and audacious interior designs continue to give us colour loving souls something to aspire to.

Photo Credits
Hero - @barij/Annie Schlecter
mmontaguesouk.com   tierradellagarto.com   jungalow.com   Umberto Pasti's Moroccan house. laboheme.shop. jungalow.com. laboheme.shop. pennymorrison.com  Tony Duquette

 

 

 

Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before being published